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Rumi

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  1. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Rophs in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  2. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Eon in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  3. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Kyphis the Bard in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  4. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Esmaralda in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  5. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Ackshan Bemunah in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  6. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Tal in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  7. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Amoran Kalamanira Kol in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  8. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Plix Plox in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  9. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Zyrxae in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  10. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Peace in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  11. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Eagle Eye in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  12. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Nimrodel in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  13. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Mya Celestia in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  14. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from DARK DEMON in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  15. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from everyone in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  16. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from lashtal in Resource Depletion: For or against?   
    @No one

    Fire is an incredibly useful wholistic landscape management tool. However, the appropriate use of fire is not analagous to the resource depletion you promote in MD.

    Thr use of fire in ecological management essentially promotes healthy new growth while eliminating dangerous, stagnant, or diseased older growth. An example is regular use of fire in a forest to eliminate the understory buildup of brush and limbs. This is called the fire ladder and presents a threat to the mature canopy when not regularly eliminated. The lack of natural or managed forest fires over 100 years in the American West is the reason our forest fires today are so devastating.

    While the underuse of fire presents opportunities for the build-up of stagnant ecology, the overuse simply destroys that which you are trying to save. A first cannot survive a constant conflagration, which removes all moisture and eventually burns all living things to the ground.

    Some further examples:

    Pruning will extend the life of a tree or other plant by eliminating older and disease prone limbs. Proper pruning of a tree can extend the life by many years. Coppicing is an extreme form of pruning where you cut the tree back to the ground to allow complete regrowth. In Europe, coppicing of trees in hedgerows and around farm fields kept trees alive for centuries that would not have survived without being cut, all while proving farmers lumber and firewood.

    Again, pruning and coppicing have their limits. The general rule in pruning is take no more than 1/3 of the top growth in any year. For plants that can coppice and regrow, you cannot cut them back to stumps every year or eventually the root system will die back just the same as the top growth.

    In pasture or prairie management, growth is checked through the use of grazing animals. Managed rotational grazing of cattle herds mimics the natural herd migrations such as the wildebeest heed in Africa and the buffalo herds once found in North America. These animals move in established migration patterns which allow full growth of pasture grasses, followed by regulation of biomass through consumption. Fields where grazing herds are not present present fire a fire danger, and often lose mature ecological elements as other ecologies move into the space.

    The overuse of cattle on a pasture, or overgrazing, which is very common on farms and ranches across the world occurs when their it's no migration pattern. Pasture animals easily destroy the field ecology, leaving a bare stubble of growth. Without strong root systems, compaction occurs under the weight of the animals and the soil structure is destroyed. Regeneration of these fields can take years in the best of conditions, and decades or centuries in areas prone to desertification.

    So, back to you No one. The constant depletion of resources is in no way like the benefits of fire. Appropriate management would be allowing full regrowth after each depletion or daily "pruning" of resources from full down to the percentage that provides full regrowth each day. These are two ways that maximize harvest and mimic the general process of nature. Since the day the first herb basket was available, the Meeting of the Roads scene has not once, NOT ONCE, had 18/18 herbs. You and your companions have overgrazed it like a herd of stupid cows. You have yet to produce any decent milk or meat and instead you have provided this load of infertile bull****
  17. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from No one in Grow Your Own   
    The MagicDuel Community Garden will be hosting an ongoing contest for the entire community.

    One mission of the MagicDuel Community Garden is to encourage all members of the community to grow gardens in their own part of the world. Now, with Mur's blessing, we are hosting the Grow Your Own contest and offering substantial rewards for players who demonstrate some gardening prowess.

    The goal of the contest is simple. Grow a plant. Document your progress.

    Participants will need to document their progress from seed to harvest with photography. Your plant should be labeled with MagicDuel and your playername. We're primarily looking for annual vegetables, but other types of vegetation are welcome too. If you want to grow a whole garden, by all means do so.

    We all live in different climates, latitudes, and hemispheres. As such, the contest will begin anew eight times a year, at the turn of each season and on the mid-season Sabbats. We will have a festival at the Community Garden on each of these days, such as our recent the Mid-Winter Festival. These festivals will also serve as completion dates and rewards will be given out at that time.

    Every Esbat (new moon and full moon) you will need to post an image of your plant in the appropriate thread on the Community Garden forum. More frequent posting is welcome, but this two week interval is the bare minimum. On each of these dates, I or another member of the Community Garden leadership will be available to discuss gardening and offer tips and advice. These dates are also important for planting. The general recommendation is that above-ground crops should be planted while the moon is waxing, and root-crops should be planted while the moon is waning.

    There will be a variety of rewards for players who participate. These include tools, seeds, and other items useful in the Community Garden and other areas of MagicDuel. Each year, one of our seasonal festivals will be an annual celebration in which a medal and trophy will be given to the player whose garden and documentation receives the most votes by the MagicDuel Community. There will also be an unreleased creature which is ONLY awarded in this contest. All players who keep their annual vegetables alive for over a year and document a second year harvest will be eligible for even more valuable rewards.

    And you can win a wishpoint! In order to win a wishpoint, you need to photograph your plant or garden daily from the exact same location (and preferably at the same time of day) and make a stop motion video of your progress. The entire catalog of your photos must be submitted in addition to the full video. You will probably need to build some kind of semi-permanent mount for your camera to make a decent video.

    Images from this contest will also be posted in the Community Garden toolshed for you to see. The crops you grow in your home gardens may just find their way into the Community Garden at the Meeting of the Roads. You might think about crops that suit your role.

    Spring (or fall ) is just around the corner. Do you have your seeds?

    All garden photography should be posted in the [url="http://magicduel.invisionzone.com/forum/305-grow-your-own/"]Grow Your Own Sub-Forum[/url]. Please read the pinned thread before posting.
  18. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from No one in Community Garden Scarecrow Contest Results   
    These are the winners of the Community Garden Scarecrow Contest. I meant to announce with more fanfare during the mid-winter festival, but we took right to the final minute to complete the toolshed. Instead, this brief post. So, without further ado...

    Winner: Dante Lionheart - Wishpoint awarded by Rumi

    #2: Tom Pouce - Collection of spell stones from Community Garden treasury - contact Rumi

    #3: Plix Plox - 1 gold coin - contact Rumi

    gonzalocsdf did not complete the contest but will receive a reward for his artwork. joshdragon offered to sponsor this contest with an Imperial Aramor and a Joker. These rewards go to gonzalocsdf. If he is not available or no longer has these creatures, I will give you from my own creature collection.

    That's it! See you in the garden
  19. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Menhir in Grow Your Own   
    There will be flexibility and there will be a limit to that flexibility as well. Plants can grow a lot in a day and that daily photography is necessary, especially for seedlings. If your stop motion video is full of gaps, you will not win a wishpoint. You will be eligible for the many other rewards.

    If you want to attain this wishpoint, make photography of your garden part of your daily routine. Do it when you brush your teeth in the morning or when you vote for free credits. Taking a single photograph won't take as long as either of those tasks.
  20. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Watcher in Unfolding the Cube   
    Rumi
  21. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Phantom Orchid in Community Garden Scarecrow Contest Results   
    These are the winners of the Community Garden Scarecrow Contest. I meant to announce with more fanfare during the mid-winter festival, but we took right to the final minute to complete the toolshed. Instead, this brief post. So, without further ado...

    Winner: Dante Lionheart - Wishpoint awarded by Rumi

    #2: Tom Pouce - Collection of spell stones from Community Garden treasury - contact Rumi

    #3: Plix Plox - 1 gold coin - contact Rumi

    gonzalocsdf did not complete the contest but will receive a reward for his artwork. joshdragon offered to sponsor this contest with an Imperial Aramor and a Joker. These rewards go to gonzalocsdf. If he is not available or no longer has these creatures, I will give you from my own creature collection.

    That's it! See you in the garden
  22. Downvote
    Rumi got a reaction from dst in Community Garden Scarecrow Contest Results   
    These are the winners of the Community Garden Scarecrow Contest. I meant to announce with more fanfare during the mid-winter festival, but we took right to the final minute to complete the toolshed. Instead, this brief post. So, without further ado...

    Winner: Dante Lionheart - Wishpoint awarded by Rumi

    #2: Tom Pouce - Collection of spell stones from Community Garden treasury - contact Rumi

    #3: Plix Plox - 1 gold coin - contact Rumi

    gonzalocsdf did not complete the contest but will receive a reward for his artwork. joshdragon offered to sponsor this contest with an Imperial Aramor and a Joker. These rewards go to gonzalocsdf. If he is not available or no longer has these creatures, I will give you from my own creature collection.

    That's it! See you in the garden
  23. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Plix Plox in Community Garden Scarecrow Contest Results   
    These are the winners of the Community Garden Scarecrow Contest. I meant to announce with more fanfare during the mid-winter festival, but we took right to the final minute to complete the toolshed. Instead, this brief post. So, without further ado...

    Winner: Dante Lionheart - Wishpoint awarded by Rumi

    #2: Tom Pouce - Collection of spell stones from Community Garden treasury - contact Rumi

    #3: Plix Plox - 1 gold coin - contact Rumi

    gonzalocsdf did not complete the contest but will receive a reward for his artwork. joshdragon offered to sponsor this contest with an Imperial Aramor and a Joker. These rewards go to gonzalocsdf. If he is not available or no longer has these creatures, I will give you from my own creature collection.

    That's it! See you in the garden
  24. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Phantom Orchid in Unfolding the Cube   
    Rumi
  25. Upvote
    Rumi got a reaction from Watcher in Grow Your Own   
    There will be flexibility and there will be a limit to that flexibility as well. Plants can grow a lot in a day and that daily photography is necessary, especially for seedlings. If your stop motion video is full of gaps, you will not win a wishpoint. You will be eligible for the many other rewards.

    If you want to attain this wishpoint, make photography of your garden part of your daily routine. Do it when you brush your teeth in the morning or when you vote for free credits. Taking a single photograph won't take as long as either of those tasks.
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