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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/11/2021 in all areas

  1. Chewett

    Who watches the Watchmen?

    Darvin
    4 points
  2. Thank you, Kaya and all the voters, also congrats to you two, Ungod and DG.
    3 points
  3. Results are in! The undisputed winner is @Poppi Chullo with his beautiful rendition of the Gates of Ages. Second to @Ungod for his welcoming coloring of the Marble Dale Park Third to @Demonic God for his colorful display of Wind's Sanctuary. I once again want to thank all 3 for participating. Rewards will be send their way soon!
    3 points
  4. Demonic God

    Rock, paper, scissors!

    As you can tell from... the Darvin quest, I am a bit obsessed with Advanced Aramors! So, as part of an experiment, I would love to craft Aramors that are capable of doing more, on their own. To that end, I'd love to start with making Aramors that can, for now, participate in simple games of Rock Paper Scissors! Your goal for this quest, would be to aid me in making such a creation. Specifically, I ask for you to design a strategy, one that is unambiguous and non randomized. Something that an Aramor can be programmed with! Your strategy will compete with others in a tournament. The rules for the tournament is as follow: Every strategy will compete with every other strategy Each duel will last until one side receive 3 10 wins. If it is mathematically impossible exceeds 500 draws, both side receives a loss it's considered a draw. This was added because the 500 draws checker got tripped... a lot. The worst strategy will be eliminated after every duel has happened. This will repeat with the surviving strategies until one emerge victorious The worst strategy would be evaluated with the following criteria: Least wins Most losses Lose against strategies with similar win/loss (i.e if A has 2 wins and 5 losses, and B also has 2 wins and 5 losses, and B lost against A, then B is eliminated) If the above criteria fail to select a single loser, all of them would be eliminated The tournament will repeat without the winner(s) until all prizes are filled The rules for strategies are as follow: Your goal is to design a strategy, to participate in a tournament of rock, paper, scissors! Your strategy must not be random and must cover all scenarios. Your strategy is not limited to the game itself. It can adapt to the round it's on, the opponent, etc. Possible strategy includes: Always choose rock If there is less than 3 participant left, always choose rock If opponent is Aia, always choose rock Cooperation is not only allowed, it is welcomed. You are free to rig matches as you please. Rewards 1st - Anniversary creature. A choice between a colored pope, and a colored elemental, courtesy of Lady @Aia del Mana 2nd - Anniversary creature. A colored pope or elemental, whichever remains after the winner had their pick 3rd - Anniversary creature. Deadline: I wish to wrap up the competition as soon as everyone who wish to join had done so. Thus, there would be two deadlines: Hard deadline: End of anniversary + 3 days. Soft deadline: 9 days (April 21st) from now. After this date, I will begin judging as soon as everyone who had announced their participant has submitted their strategy. You may join in after the soft deadline, as long as judging has not begun. Soft deadline is meant to avoid unnecessary waiting.
    1 point
  5. Alright - time to write commentaries! Aia: Her strategy consist of 2 simple states, and a way to "seed" the encounter. Her first move is determined by a pseudo-random criteria (if she's facing a male or female opponent). She has 2 states: countering her opponent last move, or lose against it. Swaps every 3 turns depending on performance. Notably, she also checks for fixed patterns - and although it's not too useful against most strategies, it does work against Ledah's. However, it is also quite slow to adapt to match condition, and even if one of the two state counters someone - this slow adaptation can lead to consistently close - but losing matches. Notably, against Pip Aelis: His strategy is to count his opponent move: their first move and their move against him, and output a counter to their most commonly used move. There's a decay value to keep the recent moves more relevant. He also have a panic mode to swap his moves around. I'd say the main downfall of this strategy (I was excited to see how well it would perform) - would be a few things: There's a very clear and apparent weakness against strategies that swap frequently. Where the move that was "most recently and most played" changes constantly - and the least likely to be played again. His panic mode helps - but the point difference could easily be too great to overcome, and many have states they could flip as well - back and forth, meaning the swap isn't too useful. He is one of the "tie trio" between him, Nep, and Draco - mainly due to the constant swapping. Notably - while Nep and Draco ties are understandable due to their highly similar strategies, Aelis output constantly changes when facing opponents with a fast changing output. Which lead to Nep/Draco strategy to immediately play against his move to output differently. Thus leading to an endless draw spiral. His first move strategy does however - lead to a consistent edge against certain strategies Against Nepgear - this gave him an edge to tie or win all encounters Against Draco rotating first move - this led to an endless tie, always. I'd say that the strategy itself has a lot of merit, as part of a bigger analytical engine The main downfall imo, would be that such strategy requires far, far more tuning in terms of number Such strategy also need to be a lot more complicated, has multiple prediction and categorization routes, which couldn't be done without a bigger model and more data/observation. Ledah: He rotates around 6 moves - PSRRSP Simple, but not a throw. This fixed pattern has a very strong counter potential to strategies that assume their opponent has a strategy This meant while not a strong contender, his strategy consistently beat certain strategies. Kaya: Well, Kaya posted their own tactic, so I'll just add a commentary: The mix of unpredictability and strategy is the main keypoint of this strategy It allows the strategy to strongly counters certain strategies It allows the strategy to try and keep an equal footing against others Random by itself - performs badly. The larger the tournament, the less likely that Random drops out before the finals This is clearly not the case - and the main reason why Kaya's strategy was allowed to sit in the gray zone. Tissy: A complicated mess of a Finite State Machine. His strategy simply has 6 states, corresponding to counter/lose/draw against his or his opponent last move. He updates the state every 2 moves, which allows a certain degree of flexibility I'd say in general, his strategy is good at predicting certain counter-move strategies, and it seems designed to do just that I'm not sure if there's any reason for the states to cycle, and you'll have to inquire him for any special reasoning! Draco & Nep: I'm grouping these two due to their similar strategies. They're both: Strategies with a self-determined first move Reacts immediately to opponent moves Both tries to directly counter opponent's move if they lost last move The main key difference would be of these three details: Draco cycles his first move - whereas Nep has a fixed first move Draco groups/considers draws and winning as "similar" outcome to react upon, Nep groups draws and losing. Draco counters his last move upon winning (or draw), whereas Nep copies his enemy last move This does lead to a surprising outcome - while Aelis draws with Draco and consistently beats or draw Nep - Nep consistently beat or draw with Draco This is due to the limited potential interaction between the two - based on Draco first move. 2 of which leads to a draw, whereas 1 of which leads to a loss The skew of the 1-2 ratio could be explained by the skewed first-move Draco give if they face against eachother at latter rounds Else: His strategy is a weighted counter based on his opponent last two moves - simple, but surprisingly resilient. By default - it counters certain pattern, and is countered by other patterns - hence it can lead to strong counter/weakness against strategy that is somewhat consistent in what they output Against strategies without a complex observation/time based state (which is most) - his strategy result in a clear win or loss. Which, in this tournament, is basically everyone but Kaya. Yoshi: He incorporates some logic with a simple rotating pattern for tiebreaker: If he wins, play same move If he ties, choose a pseudo-random rotating move If he loses, counters the enemy last move (not the way he described it, but that's effectively what it ends up being) He also have a panic mode during which he just straight up copies his enemy's last move. Pipstickz: He always play paper. Except when he sees his opponent play Scissors for their last move - then he plays Scissors. Surprisingly effective at countering counter-strategies despite its simplicity Despite its simplicity - he did manage to win the tournament under specific orderings - just not very consistent. ============================= Commentary: Well, most of my observation are listed at the above strategy discussion. There are also some key things I noticed during testing various setup, interactions, changing the participants, adding test strategies, removing certain participants to observe the rest and... It was honestly, a fun experience seeing how things clashed out. The tournament is actually a lot closer than it first seem to be - other than Kaya domination being a seemingly constant as long as her confusion array isn't horridly countered due to bad distributions. There are a few main things I'd like to talk about: The tournament has a very, very strong counter dynamic. A > B > C > A relations can be easily observed if you look at the documented pairing outcome - and that was a very, very strong determinant of how the results ends up to be. Nobody completely dominated everyone else - It was consistency against a larger, higher performing crowd that also likely to make it to latter rounds that gave Kaya their domination. Ledah and Pip - arguably the underdogs of this tournament, both have a very, very strong track record of beating Kaya. However, they are unlikely to make it to the inner rounds - giving Kaya a very strong advantage, facing mostly opponents they're comfortable beating past the first round. As such - a change of the tournament roster have been observed to drastically change the top spots. Pipstick - a strong Aia counter, when removed, bumps her position/ranking dramatically. Without neither Kaya or Pip - Aia actually consistently wins - or tie top spot in almost, if not all tournament. Notably however, the chances for ties also increases dramatically. Similarly with some slight changes - Draco actually comes out as a top winner, not Tissy nor Else as anticipated. The existence of observation/random-ish strategy serves as a very, very nice method of making the tournament outcome more interesting to observe - while strong counters gave rise to an interesting variation in dynamics as the participant changes, adaptation and non deterministic outcome (not strong counter - can win/lose/draw at specific ratio, such as the 1:2 win/draw chances of a faceoff between Nep and Draco) leads to variation in how likely someone will win given the same roster, giving rise to underdogs winning tournaments. This is an element that makes many sports interesting to see as well! All in all, I had great fun hosting this, and I hope all participants feels similarly. It is unlikely this event will be re-run anytime soon (due to the nature of it all) - but expect to see similar events in the future! Thank you all for your participation!
    1 point
  6. so we get to name 2015-2022 the dark ages? :D:D:D
    1 point
  7. With approval from Mur, to improve clarity and reduce confusion concerning the possible shapes described by the puzzle, here are the final images that one should create to obtain the shards: 1 - Blank 2 - Filled 3 - X 4 - O 5 - Plus Sign + 6 - Corners 7 - Centre Square 8 - Big Square 9 - Capital A 10 - Smiley Face 11 - Percentage sign % 12 - Diagonal Lines
    1 point
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