Jump to content

Recommended Posts

At the Howling Gates there's a symbol stating "Path of Yog-Sohoth".

this reminds me of the time god frm HP Lovecraft's novels, is there something about those mythos in the game?

If so the name should be Yog-Sothoth or at least, as I found somewhere, "Yog Sothot".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

„That is not dead which can eternal lie,

And with strange æons, even death may die“

„Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.“

In his house in R'leyeh waits dreaming the dead Cthulhu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Path of Yog Sohoth

The gates to Necrovion are sealed with an eloborate five-pointed star and the notice "only gods may enter".

This star symbol appears on the front of the Necronomicon; in the Lovecraftian mythos this is a book of magic and lore written by Abdul Al Hazred, the Mad Arab. There are versions of it written by various IRL characters based on the mythos of Lovecraft.

The significance of Yog Sohoth is not known; Yog Soggoth is the trickster god of Lovecraftian lore. Corpulent, headless and nude, his tricks are often fatal and gory. As with most of Lovecraft's gods, to be in his presence is to become mad. He seeks to enter the mortal world and feast upon us.

How this relates to the boundary between No Mans's Land and Necrovion is not currently known. Perhaps witnessing the Shades would be as maddening as witnessing an Elder Thing. It is said that none survive Deep Necrovion unchanged. You are invited to speculate.

The seal on the path resemble the Elder Seal that holds extraplanar entities. It represents the power of the Elder or Outer gods. Many mischeivious and supernatural things are bound by it. Interestingly, we ourselves cannot pass it without special countenance. What does this say about us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This star symbol appears on the front of the Necronomicon

This is a plausible if unsupported assertion. Present your sources, if you like.

...in the Lovecraftian mythos this is a book of magic and lore written by Abdul Al Hazred, the Mad Arab.

The book Necronomicon, as usually presented, is an inferior Latin translation (by Olaus Wormius) of the Greek translation (by Theodorus Philetas, who gave the book the name "Necronomicon," which roughly means "Book of the Dead"), itself an inferior translation of the Kitab al-Azif written by Abd'al-Hazred.

The significance of Yog Sohoth is not known; Yog Soggoth is the trickster god of Lovecraftian lore. Corpulent, headless and nude, his tricks are often fatal and gory.

With respect, you appear to have conflated Yog-Sothoth with Y'golonac. The attested physical incarnations of Yog-Sothoth include a blinding light (Aforgomon, Clark Ashton Smith), a collection of iridescent spheres (August Derleth), and a massive, horrible collection of entrails and organs (implicit in the description of Wilbur Whateley's brother, the eponymous Dunwich Horror; cf. the famous illustration by Erol Otus [my link won't work, but if you run a Google image search for Erol Otus and Yog-Sothoth it is the first hit]).

Yog-Sothoth is said to be the Key and Guardian of the Gate, and to be coterminous with all space and time. I quote the following passage from "Through the Gates of the Silver Key":

It was an All-in-One and One-in-All of limitless being and self — not merely a thing of one Space-Time continuum, but allied to the ultimate animating essence of existence's whole unbounded sweep — the last, utter sweep which has no confines and which outreaches fancy and mathematics alike. It was perhaps that which certain secret cults of earth have whispered of as YOG-SOTHOTH, and which has been a deity under other names; that which the crustaceans of Yuggoth worship as the Beyond-One, and which the vaporous brains of the spiral nebulae know by an untranslatable Sign...

He is also associated with a more benign avatar, 'Umr at-Tawil (the Prolonged of Life), who is said to help sorcerers in the process of dimensional travel; in the same story quoted above, he is described as the silhouette of a man (Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango no no no that's not right) behind a shimmering veil.

As with most of Lovecraft's gods, to be in his presence is to become mad. He seeks to enter the mortal world and feast upon us.

Exactly right. Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson identified him with the Eater of Souls in their Illuminatus! trilogy, but one has only to read "The Dunwich Horror" to know messing with Yog-Sothoth is unwise in the extreme.

Tarquinus, my MD character, claims that 'Yog-Sothoth' is a transcriptional error, and seems to identify Yog-Sothoth with Ialdabaoth, Achamoth, and Crystalman. He refers to Yog-Sothoth as "The Abnormal One" and calls the god his sworn enemy.

If you consider that Yog-Sothoth is coterminous with all space and time, you might realize how crazy Tarquinus really is.

The seal on the path resemble the Elder Seal that holds extraplanar entities. It represents the power of the Elder or Outer gods. Many mischeivious and supernatural things are bound by it. Interestingly, we ourselves cannot pass it without special countenance. What does this say about us?

Tarquinus (the character) would say: "It says that someone has played us for fools."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The book Necronomicon, as usually presented, is an inferior Latin translation (by Olaus Wormius) of the Greek translation (by Theodorus Philetas, who gave the book the name "Necronomicon," which roughly means "Book of the Dead"), itself an inferior translation of the Kitab al-Azif written by Abd'al-Hazred.
/me being pedantic/picky

whilst this is true, a sometimes more popular translation of ''Necromonicon'' is ''The Book Of The Law Of The Dead'' although depending on where you split the word and what language you translate from it can mean many different things

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
/me being pedantic/picky

whilst this is true, a sometimes more popular translation of ''Necromonicon'' is ''The Book Of The Law Of The Dead'' although depending on where you split the word and what language you translate from it can mean many different things

Actually, it can't. Normally, I'd shrug and say, 'ok,' but you've activated the classicist, the Scot, and the Lovecraft scholar in me, so I cannot help but retort. :P

The use of the root nomos as in 'name, law' is erroneous when subjecting the name to etymological analysis:

While the origin of the name offers us no ambiguities, however, this is not the case with its interpretation. Most interpret the title The Necronomicon as "The Book of Dead Names". This, however, is certainly incorrect. The derivation of the first root from (nekros, dead, corpse) is definitely right, but the second root cannot derive from (onoma, name, title, noun) as the combining form of that word is onomat-, as in onomatomania, the uncontrollable obsession with words or names or their meanings or sounds.

Some may also have in mind the Greek (onyma, name), as in pseudonym, antonym, etc., or the Latin nomen (name), root nomin-, but it is easily seen that these are equally impossible.

Another attempt to etymologize the title as "The Book of Dead Names" breaks it down into nekros plus the non-existent and impossible form nomikon, a book of names.

Lovecraft himself offered a translation of the title:

The name Necronomicon ( [nekros], corpse; [nomos], law; [eikôn], image = An Image [or Picture -- HPL's brackets] of the Law of the Dead) occurred to me in the course of a dream, although the etymology is perfectly sound. In assigning an Arabic author to a Greek-named book I was whimsically reversing the condition whereby the monumental astronomical work of the Greek Ptolemy ( '[Megalê Syntaxis Tês `Astronomias]) is commonly known by the Arabic name Almagest (or more truly, Tabrir al Magesthi), which was evolved from a corruption of the original title when the Arabs made their translation ( [megistê] is the superlative of [megalê], & the Arabs probably found it in common use to distinguish the work from another of Ptolemy's) (Selected Letters V, 418).

Those concerned with authorial intent will feel bound by Lovecraft's interpretation, while it is certainly of interest to anyone reading his work. While he was on the right track with nomos, however, the interpretation of the final root as deriving from eikôn is definitely mistaken, as we shall see later.

The exact meaning of the root nom- has caused some differences of opinion. It comes from a family of words including the verb (nemein, to distribute, pasture, manage), the noun (nomos, usage, custom, law), and the combining form -nomia, (-nomos, distributing, arranging) used in the naming of sciences such as astronomy. The last would seem to be the interpretation favored by Lovecraft, the title thus indicating a treatise on the scientific study of the dead, which science would be named in this interpretation necronomy. Others have suggested the second choice, translating the title as "The Customs of the Dead". Still others have proposed deriving the nom- element from another set of related Greek words, with meanings such as "pasture", "region" "(political) division", thus giving the translation: "Guide[book] to the Regions of the Dead". Yet another possibility which suggests itself (though I do not recall seeing it mentioned before) is taking -nomia (management, control) as in economy, economics, "the art of household management"; -- thus giving "The Management of the Dead", which is not too far out of line of the conception of the book in the stories where it first appeared, "The Festival" & "The Hound". It would thus perhaps belong to the science of necronomics.

Yet another attempt to interpret the name views as combining two roots instead of three: nekros, dead, with nomikos, lawyer. As attractive as many might find "The Book of Dead Lawyers", however, this is not an accurate translation.

Finally, to resolve these nagging doubts we may turn to S.T. Joshi's "Afterword" to Lovecraft's "History of the Necronomicon". In addition to being the preëminent Lovecraft scholar, Joshi has a degree in Classics, and so is in his area of specialty twice over. He analyzes the title by comparison with that of the Astronomica (plural; singular Astronomicôn) of Manilius, a Latin work on astronomy which Lovecraft knew and cited. (E.g., in an article titled "Mysteries of the Heavens", published in the Asheville Gazette-News April 3, 1915, he says: "Manilius, referring to the Milky Way in his 'Astronomicon.'...") He breaks it down as follows: : nekros, dead person, corpse; : nemein, to consider; and -: -ikon, an adjectival suffix equivalent to Latin -icum, English -ic, -ical. From this last it can be seen that the strained interpretation of -icon as eikôn, picture, image = "book", is totally unnecessary. Joshi thus gives the Greek title the following rendering: "Book Concerning the Dead".

From http://www.geocities.com/soho/9879/necname.htm

My Latin is far stronger than my Greek, but I believe S.T. Joshi puts the matter, as it were, to its final rest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

/has previously read this section

The name Necronomicon ( [nekros], corpse; [nomos], law; [eikôn], image = An Image [or Picture -- HPL's brackets] of the Law of the Dead) occurred to me in the course of a dream, although the etymology is perfectly sound. In assigning an Arabic author to a Greek-named book I was whimsically reversing the condition whereby the monumental astronomical work of the Greek Ptolemy ( '[Megalê Syntaxis Tês `Astronomias]) is commonly known by the Arabic name Almagest (or more truly, Tabrir al Magesthi), which was evolved from a corruption of the original title when the Arabs made their translation ( [megistê] is the superlative of [megalê], & the Arabs probably found it in common use to distinguish the work from another of Ptolemy's) (Selected Letters V, 418).
and a bit surrounding it

*mumbles under breath* still wasnt what you said it was in your previous post *ends mumble*

you clearly have looked into this more than me lol, and it has been far too long since i looked up lovecraft and spent time reading about the things surrounding, i bow down to your superior knowledge (on this subject :P)

EDIT:hehe check my disclaimer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is a plausible if unsupported assertion. Present your sources, if you like.

i have this exact book at my house :D

but there are tons of images on google: Necronomicon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i have this exact book at my house :)

but there are tons of images on google: Necronomicon

Thanks. I had forgotten that. I am familiar with that book... but I was referring to the fictitious, "real" Necronomicon rather than the work of fiction purporting to be the real Necronomicon.

My point was really grounded in the study of Lovecraft lore and Cthulhiana - there is no particular reason to associate that symbol with the "real" Necronomicon translated by (the historical by partly fictionalized by Lovecraft) Olaus Wormius or Theodorus Philetas. The book described by Lovecraft is demonstrably his own invention; the book you reference is a somewhat clever hoax of which Lovecraft himself would surely have approved. He loved hoaxes in fiction, and as a man whose work was never fully appreciated in his own lifetime, he'd have been flattered and pleased that one of his childhood imaginings became a "real" book that has sold more than a few copies. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks. I had forgotten that. I am familiar that book... but I was referring to the fictitious, "real" Necronomicon rather than the work of fiction purporting to be the real Necronomicon.

My point was really grounded in the study of Lovecraft lore and Cthulhiana - there is no particular reason to associate that symbol with the "real" Necronomicon translated by (the historical by partly fictionalized by Lovecraft) Olaus Wormius or Theodorus Philetas. The book described by Lovecraft is demonstrably his own invention; the book you reference is a somewhat clever hoax of which Lovecraft himself would surely have approved. He loved hoaxes in fiction, and as a man whose work was never fully appreciated in his own lifetime, he'd have been flattered and pleased that one of his childhood imaginings became a "real" book that has sold more than a few copies. :)

100% dead, spot on! Just one complaint. The oldest known version was in Arabic by the Mad Arab, Abdul al Hazred, a name that has haunted me for 42 years.

I find it so amusing that most readers and purveyors of the work of fiction do not know of it's origin or that it is a fake fake. On that note I will segue to Orson Welles' sparkling film, F for Fake, a genuine story of a fake fraud and so very credible! Then, too, there was Tom Lehrer's lyric from the '60's, "genuine copy of a fake Dior."

'Nuf said!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
100% dead, spot on! Just one complaint. The oldest known version was in Arabic by the Mad Arab, Abdul al Hazred, a name that has haunted me for 42 years.

I find it so amusing that most readers and purveyors of the work of fiction do not know of it's origin or that it is a fake fake. On that note I will segue to Orson Welles' sparkling film, F for Fake, a genuine story of a fake fraud and so very credible! Then, too, there was Tom Lehrer's lyric from the '60's, "genuine copy of a fake Dior."

'Nuf said!

I reference Al-Azif further up. :) But I do thank you for keeping me honest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Harbinger' post='17881' date='Oct 4 2008, 05:50 PM']Peering. Ineluctable. Fading.

The Angien Statue At The Gates Stay As A Vigil. It Holds The Seal. Bears Warning To Both The Unhallowed And The Meek.[/quote]
Gods are easier to contain than mortals. Tread lightly, "angien," as some here contend against all who presume to narrow the sweep of space and time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"The Call of Cthulhu" is an obvious place to start. His better works include "The Dunwich Horror", "At the Mountains of Madness", and "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
one thing left from the past, heading to a direction that i now admit as being stupid, now is fixed.
The second necrovion gate will be there but without any relation to others work. The "gate of the gods" that allows entrance to a different necrovion will be again there but in a tottaly original way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Forum Statistics

    15,831
    Total Topics
    173,482
    Total Posts
  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Upcoming Events

    No upcoming events found
  • Recent Event Reviews

×
×
  • Create New...